#antarctica
An Ice Core that Goes Back Five Million YearsIce cores give us an extremely useful timeline of the earth. Scientists drill down through a thick layer of ice and pull up a column that may contain plants, animals, pollen, ash, and other markers that tell us about the earth thousands or even millions of years ago. Air bubbles in their ancient pristine state can be studied, and chemicals like carbon dioxide reveal the earth's conditions from their time.A 31-foot ice core was retrieved from the ice covering Antarctica's Ong Valley in 2017 and '18. Scientists have determined that the ice core is made up of two glaciation events (because glaciers drift), one from three million years ago, and the one underneath is between 4.3 and 5.1 million years! The oldest ice core dated before that was a mere 2.7 million years old. There will be years of analysis of this ancient ice that will tell us more than we ever knew about what happened on earth five million years ago. Read more about this record-breaking ice core at New Atlas. -via Damn Interesting ​(Image credit: Jaakko Putkonen) #icecore #glacier #Antarctica
#woodworking
Ornate Wood Mosaics That Use No DyesAp MacKenzie of Woodland Porpoise Workshop is a master woodworker. His pieces are astonishingly vivid works of art. Lately, he’s been making finely cut mosaics made of wood. He doesn’t dye the wood, but instead chooses woods that have just the right natural colors, such as these that form the Sheriff of Nottingham from Disney’s Robin Hood.
#italy
The Fountain Is Made of LavaStreet Art Utopia shares this image of unknown provenance from L’Aquila, Italy. This 1934 sculpture by Nicola D’Antino shows two bronze nudes pouring water out of a bowl. Fontana Luminosa (Luminous Fountain) forms the center of a fountain the center of the city.When viewed from the right angle at the right time of day, sunlight washes through the water to create the impression that the women are pouring out lava or liquid sunlight rather than pure water. A 2020 travel guidebook to Abruzzo, the region of Italy in which L’Aquila can be found, reveals that lamps can add other colors to the image.#fountains #opticalillusions #Italy
#sculptures
Balloons and Wire Form Modern Venus of WillendorfsDid you instantly recognize what these sculptures were imitating? I did. They closely resemble the famous Venus of Willendorf, a nude sculpture found in Austria in 1908. This tiny limestone sculpture dates back to about 25,000 years ago. It was probably a fertility totem, as its exaggerated hips and breasts speak to, shall we say, a prehistoric male gaze.Artists Naama Steinbock and Idan Friedman of Reddish Studios in Israel name their collection of works the “Venus of Jaffa”—a reference to the large coastal city in Israel. When the artists inflate the balloons inside the copper wire frames, they form the sensuous curves of this female archetype.-via Colossal#sculptures #NaamaSteinbock #IdanFriedman #VenusOfWillendorf
#fooddate
What Does the Expiration Date on Food Really Mean?The dates on food packaging can be pretty confusing. We think of them as expiration dates, but they say things like "sell by" or "best by" or even "use by." Does that mean we should throw a food product out by then? Not necessarily. These dates are not mandated by law, but were determined by food manufacturers. Often it's the date that quality or taste can no longer be guaranteed. Stores use these dates to keep their products properly rotated, selling the oldest products first so the newer products can take their place. Consumers don't know what criteria was used to determine such dates, and does it make a difference is the food is sealed or unsealed before that date? How about if we freeze it? How do we tell if a food product is too old to eat? Read about expiration dates- how they are determined, what they really mean, and how to judge the safety of your food at The Conversation. -via Damn Interesting(Image credit: Frank Farm) #fooddate #expirationdate #foodsafety
#swings
Artistic Hammocks and Swings by Federica SalaDornob introduces us to Federica Sala, an Italian designer who offers whimsical household objects and sculptures in a body of work calledGeometrie da Compagnia.  They are designed to be art in motion.The example above is called “Bruno’s Swing”. This safety swing for a young child conveys the maternal love that the child experiences as he enjoys everyday childhood play.